Finding Your Voice in the Workplace

voice

6 ways to get you from behind the curtain and into the spotlight.

voice

 

Do you ever feel as if your hard work, talent and ability are going unnoticed at work?   Do you feel as if your opinion, perspective or voice doesn’t matter? If so, I can tell you from my own personal experience that you’re not alone.  Almost a year ago, I was having a conversation with a Receptionist.  That’s her title, but really she handled multiple roles as the Receptionist.  Anytime she took a vacation things would fall apart, no one else had the ability to perform her job quite like her.

During our conversation she mentioned that she was going back to school to further her education. I asked her what did she want to pursue and her response was she wasn’t quite sure, but she just wants to feel like “somebody” or important at work.  This was sad to hear, but also very interesting.  She had no idea how important she really was, part of this is not being recognized properly from management, but also her not realizing that she already has everything she needs for her voice to be heard.

Are you ready to step in the spotlight?  Do you have a fire that’s burning inside of you ready to ignite your workplace?  Here are 6 ways to stand out at work and take your career to the next level.
1. Your Appearance.  Sound vain??? Whether you realize it or not the way that you dress is a part of your brand. People pay attention to how you look after yourself. You always want to be dressed for the position you want and make sure your consistent…. “In all you do, brand you.”
2. Ask Questions. If you were invited to be a part of a meeting or discussion that impacts your department and/or the business don’t be just a warm body…ask questions. Now, it’s important to think through what you’re going to ask so take notes during the meeting. It’s very annoying for someone to ask a question when the answer has already been given during the discussion. If you have a heads up about the meeting do a little research prior to the meeting to help you prepare.
3. Volunteer. If you have the capacity…volunteer to help out with special projects. This allows you to showcase another skill set that maybe your supervisor didn’t realize you had.
4. Network. Don’t stay behind your desk all day, walk around and get to know your co-workers and managers. It’s rare that I use inter-company mail, if you need to deliver something to someone in a different department and it’s within walking distance, take it yourself. I know it seems small, but it will help you develop relationships.  It works!
5. Share ideas. If you know of a way to improve a process or procedure, share it. People will start coming to you wanting your feedback on their ideas. This can create so many opportunities for you, you can almost write your own job description.
6. Master what you do. Sometimes we want to move on to something different before we’ve mastered our original responsibilities. This is very important. If you master what you currently do than you will be seen as the expert. If you’re known as the expert that will open more doors than you can imagine.  It’s hard to replace the expert.

 cassandra smallCassandra Holdsclaw is an Entrepreneur and Career Coach to women.  She has a background in Human Resources Management and has a true passion for helping women find happiness in their career. She recently launched a career coaching company called Career Talk With Cassandra.  Career Talk With Cassandra was created to inspire, motivate, equip and empower women to use their voice to obtain the career of their dreams refusing to settle. Career Talk With Cassandra offers a wide range of programs and services from individual coaching to workshops and keynote speeches.

To contact Cassandra, please send an email to info@careertalkwithcassandra.com.  You can also follow her on the following social media sites:

www.facebook.com/careertalkwithcassandra

Instagram:  @cassandratalkscareers

 

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter